Saving During Pregnancy to Avoid the Financial Baby Blues

By on May 15, 2017

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Congratulations, you’re expecting a new baby!  In nine short months you will have a new life to care for, feed, bath and love.  In the midst of thinking about what they will look like or what impact they will make the world, you can easily forget that this baby comes with a hefty price tag.  Today, just about everybody is looking to save money wherever they can, so here are a few suggestions for reducing the growing cost of maternity care and raising a baby.

Start to prepare by saving money through the pregnancy and shortly after the birth to ensure your personal financial safety net can last you both for years to come.

Saving on Hospital and Health Care for Mom and Baby

Start Saving Money for Maternity and/or Paternity Leave

If you want to be financially prepared for the time off  parents are allotted once the baby is born, determine how much you need to work overtime to make up for and save that amount throughout your pregnancy.  This way you don’t have to worry about finances once the baby arrives. If Dad planning on taking some time off as well, account for that break in income into your household budget, as well.

Compare Health Care Plans, Hospital Costs and Pediatricians

One of the biggest costs associated with having your baby will be the cost of delivery. Not only should you consider what the hospital or birthing center will charge, you should also balance what your insurance will cover. What is covered and what procedures cost can vary greatly, even in the same city. So find out the expense differences so you can make an informed decision that saves you money.

Get FREE Samples From your OB/GYN and Pediatrician

As you get closer to the arrival of your baby, you will likely visit with your pediatrician to go over questions and plans for the child’s health care. Take this as an opportunity to ask for any samples they may have to offer. Most pediatricians have samples of formula, diapers and more. It may not be a lot, but the free products can help save you money those first few weeks.

Saving for Baby at Home

Get Gifts and Other FREE Stuff by Having a Baby Shower

One of the benefits of expecting a baby is that people want to buy gifts for you and the baby — let them! A shower can be thrown by co-workers, friends, neighbors or family. Let them know the things you need so they can buy them and you can avoid any duplicate products.

Ask for Hand-me-Downs or Shop Secondhand for Baby Clothes

Many first-time parents don’t understand that newborns grow out of their clothes very quickly. You can easily save money by buying gently used secondhand clothes from friends, family or retailers. There are a variety of places to get them: yard sales, consignment shops, friends and family members. And if you are having a second or third child, you can also recycle the clothes from your elder children for the next child.

Get Maternity Clothes Secondhand or Used by Friends

If you have friends who are pregnant or have been recently, this is a great opportunity to get some gently used secondhand clothes for yourself (especially if you have friends who are the same size). There is no need to go out and buy a new wardrobe if you can share among friends or buy used. That way, all of you can save the money for other needs – like ice cream and prenatal massages.

Start Clipping Coupons and Stocking up on Non-Perishables Now

Some companies, such as Gerber and Earth’s Best, offer coupons when you become pregnant. They may require you to sign up on their websites to receive them, but they offer a variety of coupons you can use once you have your baby.  Check you local supermarket advertisements and start stocking up on items which will not expire within a year. If coupon-hunting isn’t your thing, you can save money by buying generic products.

Control Your Spending Habits – NO Impulse Buying, I know It’s Cute

Avoid the ‘need’ to buy everything. As a new parent you want your child to have everything — that is an understandable desire. Save yourself money and stress by not giving in to that desire. One example is a high chair. A high chair isn’t needed immediately, since the baby won’t be able to sit on its own safely. Yet high chairs are still a popular and costly purchase many make before a baby is born. You can cut this cost by buying something else like a booster seat that straps to a dining room chair. This also can’t be used safely for some time, but it can be a great option to save both space and money once the time comes.

Starting Stocking Your Own Pantry with Canned Goods and Freezers With Homemade Instant Meals

Stock your freezer with meals. The last thing you’re going to want to do once you bring your little one home is cook dinner. This leads to temptation to order in food and spend money. But you can avoid this by pre-making meals during the last few weeks of your pregnancy and freezing them. Once you’re home from the hospital, you just have to pull out a meal, warm it up and you’re good to go.

Having a baby is, without a doubt the most precious, life changing event of your life. However, having a baby is also a very costly experience. With a little planning and creativity you can save money and start a lifestyle of making your budget stretch.

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About Terri A. Kamoto

Senior writer for FSN - Terri is a former financial analyst dedicated to making personal finances, budgeting, investment and insurance advice accessible, up to date and easy to understand. It is hard to find professional advice written in a language someone without a financial background can understand. Terri helps companies synthesize industry lingo and expertise into clear and informative content which builds smarter, financially successful individuals. You can find Terri on !

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